I taught college law enforcement for 20 years, 13 years as program coordinator. My last year, a parent complained that I was the rudest person she’d ever met because I said NO. I said NO to her son, a grown man who wanted to be a police officer but couldn’t call me himself to ask for a make-up exam for a missed make-up exam. He wanted special considerations to do what hundreds of other students were doing without special considerations but missed his chance for his first make-up exam.

My alleged offense was saying NO. I said NO to mom who acted as his agent. And I also said NO to her son, that he couldn’t talk down to a secretary after he missed his first make-up date. I said NO that he didn’t run the program after he tried to circumvent the process. And I said NO he couldn’t re-schedule a makeup exam for a missed makeup exam. He ran out of chances. He’d been given a second chance but blew it.

I have been blessed to have taught thousands of decent, dedicated hard-working students who spilled their guts to earn a career. I was blessed to have been able to work in a profession that allowed me to make a direct impact on lives, minute-by-minute. But I don’t miss anything about the profession because the balance was thrown out of whack – the negatives outweighed the positives. The era of extreme entitlement changed my job into a day-care coordinator. I raised three daughters. I had no desire in raising hundreds of children who legally were classified as adult. I had no desire to contradict my beliefs for a paycheque, so I resigned instead of resigning my principles.

Every single lecture I taught included some part of my Earn the Right message. I never missed a chance to teach the most important lessons of all. Here are a few samples:
– You won’t get everything you want to moment you graduate. Nothing will be handed to you.
– You won’t be recruited like you’re royalty. You will have to apply for jobs and fight hard to get them because thousands of other people want the same jobs.
– You will suffer setbacks.
– You will have to go through a tough struggle to survive
– If you’re afraid of competition, you will never get what you want
– If you’re afraid of struggle, you will never get where you want to go.
– If you are spoiled, you will crack under the pressure
– If you do get hired, you are not going to start at the top.
– If you get hired, you will not have company cars, company phones, or expense accounts.
– If you get hired, you will suffer more setbacks. Over and over again.
– If you get hired, you will have to grow up fast to survive
– If you get hired, criminals will not treat you special.
– If you get hired, you will actually have to work hard to earn the money that taxpayers
– If the reason you want to get hired is high-pay, benefits, pension, and prestige, your life will be hell.
– If you’re weak, change. Or you will survive a Darwinism that will chew up the weak.
– If you get hired, give back more – give the taxpayers more than they’re paying you.
– Treat people properly. Don’t be a punk.
– When back-up is needed, drop everything. Get there.
– Getting hired is a privilege, not a right.

Gino Arcaro has written 12 books. He started his writing career by writing 6 best-selling academic law enforcement textbooks. Then he changed his focus and wrote 6 non-academic books to compete on a new stage. The first book is Soul of a Lifter, available in paperback and e-book. The book is about how lifting is a life-saver – lifting others and lifting weight. Dual-purpose lifting. You can review all Gino’ books them by clicking here at the top of the S.O.A.L. blog.